Arboretum Et Fruticetum Britannicum; Or, the Trees and Shrubs of Britain, Native and Foreign, Hardy and Half-Hardy, Pictorially and Botanically Delineated, and Scientifically and Popularly Described with Their Propagation, Volume 3

Arboretum Et Fruticetum Britannicum; Or, the Trees and Shrubs of Britain, Native and Foreign, Hardy and Half-Hardy, Pictorially and Botanically Delineated, and Scientifically and Popularly Described with Their Propagation, Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1838 edition. Excerpt: ...trees are found, they generally throw up stickers from which plants may be selected; or cuttings of the roots may be made use of. In some situations, seedling trembling poplars are abundant in the woods; and these are sometimes collected by the country people, and sold to the nurserymen. When it is intended to raise the trembling poplar from seed artificially, the seeds ought to be gathered as soon as they drop, and immediately sown on light, rich, moist soil, and covered with the same soil as slightly as possible, and shaded by branches, spray, leaves, or mats. The plants w ill come up at the end of four or five weeks, and will grow 1 in. or 2 in. the first summer. In the future culture of the tree very little or no care is required, at least in Britain. On the Continent, and particularly in Belgium, it is very subject to the attacks of insects, and especially to those of the larva? of different kinds of moths, butterflies, and Tenthreclinidae. These are collected in the beginning of summer, by order of the public authorities; and payments are made to the collectors in proportion to the quantity they bring in. The Tipula juniperina L. lays its eggs in the leaves and leaf-stalks of this species; in consequence of which circumstance, red glandular substances, about the size of a pea, are produced: but the injury done by these is trifling, compared with that effected by other insects, which eat away the disk of the leaf. Statistics. In England, in the environs of London, at Kenwood, Hampstead, P. t. pendula, 8 yean planted, is 20 ft high, in sandy soil; at Syon, the species, 70 ft high; in the Isle of Jersey, in Saunders's Nursery, 10 years planted, it is 40 ft high, the diameter of the trunk 14 in., and of the head 44 ft; In Staffordshire, at...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 464 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 24mm | 821g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236552237
  • 9781236552235