Arabic Proverbs or the Manners and Customs of the Modern Egyptians; Illustrated from Their Proverbial Sayings Current at Cairo

Arabic Proverbs or the Manners and Customs of the Modern Egyptians; Illustrated from Their Proverbial Sayings Current at Cairo

By (author) 

List price: US$13.69

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1830 edition. Excerpt: ... some travellers have related, ) in triumph to the houses of their neighbours. But this practice is not adopted by the more respectable inhabitants, among whom the chemise is exhibited only in the bridegroom's house to the women assembled there; and in many instances the people of high rank condemn even this exhibition as indecent, and no longer allow it. On that night, immediately after the conclusion of their first interview, the bride and bridegroom retire to separate apartments; next morning they go to the bath; and for seven days after some female relations constantly remain with the bride in the house of her husband, but he is not permitted to approach her. The bride furnishes herself with clothes for the marriage, and with ornaments; she brings likewise to her husband's house much furniture, bedding, kitchen utensils, &c. (called yity) often of greater value than the price which was paid for her; those articles continue her property. If a widow marries, none of those ceremonies take place; the nuptials are celebrated in a quiet manner by the family alone. Even the marriage of a virgin is sometimes not accompanied by any festivities, but for this omission an express stipulation must be made at the time of betrothing; else the bride and her friends would consider themselves insulted. It is always expected that those who are invited to nuptials should bring some presents; sugar, coffee, and wax candles are the articles generally sent on such occasions to the bridegroom's house, upon a large board covered with a fine handkerchief. Divorces are extremely common at Cairo; I believe there are few individuals who have not divorced one wife. Polygamy is much less frequent than Europeans imagine. Of one hundred married men in this city...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236896939
  • 9781236896933