The Arabic Manual; Comprising a Condensed Grammar of Both the Classical and Modern Arabic, Reading Lessons and Exercises, with Analyses, and a Vocabulary of Useful Words

The Arabic Manual; Comprising a Condensed Grammar of Both the Classical and Modern Arabic, Reading Lessons and Exercises, with Analyses, and a Vocabulary of Useful Words

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885 edition. Excerpt: ...English vulgarism by which I have translated it: "The thing disputed about." The Objective Case. The following require the objective case: 1. The object of the action of a verb. 2. Words defining or specifying the action. 3. Nouns used adverbially. 4. Tho cause or effect of the action. 5. Words expressing the state or condition. 6. Words following particles of exception, vocatives (not addressing a person present), and a few other instances of which details are given in the following paragraphs: The object of a Verb. The object of the verb is that upon which the action falls, as?4j ut--r "I struck Zeid." C C" jf: -re A verb may have two objects, as UfejJ t) ut-W "I gave Zeid a dirhem"; or two objects and a word defining the nature or period of the action, or the state of the!-C WC--- C-j G-C object, as Vslki c.iy olc "I showed to Zeid 'Amr in the act of going away." "I struck, conjointly with 'Amr, Zeid, before the Emir, on Friday, a severe blow by way of correcting him." The Genitive Or Dependent Case. The genitive case is peculiar to nouns, and is employed in two instances. Many other nouns are used as prepositions, such as t "except," ji " over," etc. They have the accusative form without tenwin. The Vocative. The vocative particles are V, Vrt, vle, of which the first, is the more common. They usually govern the noun in the subjective case. The vocative is put in the objective case--1. When the noun is in construction, as JM Ac l- "Oh 'Abdallah!" Or when it governs another noun in the accusative, as!W WU= U "O thou who art ascending a mountain!" 2. When it is undefined, or not directly addressed, e.g. as when a blind man says, JU...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236611616
  • 9781236611611