Appletons' Annual Cyclopedia and Register of Important Events; Embracing Political, Military, and Ecclesiastical Affairs; Public Documents; Biography, Statistics, Commerce, Finance, Literature, Science, Agriculture, and Volume 21

Appletons' Annual Cyclopedia and Register of Important Events; Embracing Political, Military, and Ecclesiastical Affairs; Public Documents; Biography, Statistics, Commerce, Finance, Literature, Science, Agriculture, and Volume 21

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ...cases of violation are reported, one resulting in death. Here the Jews seem to have been most energetio in their resistance. Of the 800 arrests made, 150 were Jews, 26 of whom were afterward charged with carrying revolvers without a permit. The police estimated the damage done at 1,187,831 rubles, while those more immediately concerned raised the sum to 8,000,000. Similar scenes took place on the same day at Wolvezysk, on the borders, where a riot had been announced for the Sunday. A week afterward the lower orders of Berdyczew rose against the Jews, and, on May 24th, a riotous disturbance occurred at Zmerinka, in Podolia. Thus, within a month of the first outbreak, almost every town of importance in Southern Russia had seen such horrors as above described. Apart from the influence of ringleaders, the rioters had no cause to incite them to rapine except the force of contagion and the impression that the Czar had really transferred all Jewish property to his orthodox subjects. If once this impression had been officially removed, the epidemic would have been checked. In many cases it was distinctly shown that the peasants liked the Jews, and only pillaged because they thought it had been ordered. At Bougaifka, for example, a few days after the peasants had destroyed the property of the Jews, they became contrite, and gave their Jewish neighbors eight hundred rubles as some compensation for the damage they themselves had caused. In the face of such a fact, it is tolerably certain that, if the supposed proclamation had been energetically and officially denied, the riots might never have reached the extent that they eventually did. The contagion spread as far as Saratov in early June, and thence to Astrakhan; it even reached a town near Tomsk, ..show more

Product details

  • 12-17
  • Paperback | 852 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 43mm | 1,492g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236813227
  • 9781236813220