The Appeal of John Whalley Master; B.A. of Brazen-Nose College, to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Visitor and Interpreter of the Statutes of All-Souls College, Oxford, Against the Warden and Fellows Thereof, Relative to His Right of

The Appeal of John Whalley Master; B.A. of Brazen-Nose College, to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Visitor and Interpreter of the Statutes of All-Souls College, Oxford, Against the Warden and Fellows Thereof, Relative to His Right of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1794 edition. Excerpt: ...of Archbishop Chichele, there ought to be 40 in the College, and your Grace's p predecessor predecessor has driven 30 of them out, and 1 protest, if this is permitted, I dont't know why some successor of your Grace should not reject the whole. I say if your Grace was to do that, there is an end of this question.--If it is not reasonable to suppose that, do the words of the Charter, on the fair import of them, shew it? 1 say they do not; I say the most reasonable and natural construction is that, which I put upon it. My Lord, the words are not according to the pleasure of the Archbishop of Canterbury for the time being, but according to the ordinances of Archbishop Chichele and his successors. It must be collected from attending to the circumstances, which surnifli the principles upon which these Charters ought to be construed; and if it be generally proved, that the Founder may give Statutes, reserving to himself the power of altering them, (and when you consider that the fair sense of the words which my friend has commented upon, may be answered by considering the Archbishop in a subordinate sense as founder) I say the probable meaning of such Charter is this, --" I Chichele, Archbishop of Canterbury for the time being, beg the King to apply such and such property, to a corporate body, making me cofounder, and permitting me to make my own own Statutes."--If there is any other sense in these words, that Chichele could not be the Founder of these Statutes, how is it to be answered? Must we not understand these words as they are?--When a roan wants to found a College, in a sense difserent from the sense in which the King might do it, the man who sounds it might naturally enough be supposed to say this, I am the Founder, as I gave the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236620208
  • 9781236620200