Appeal to the British Nation, on the Greatest Reform Yet Remaining to Be Accomplished; Read and Adopted at the World's Convention, Held in London, August, 1846

Appeal to the British Nation, on the Greatest Reform Yet Remaining to Be Accomplished; Read and Adopted at the World's Convention, Held in London, August, 1846

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1846 edition. Excerpt: ...Dresser of Cotton Yarn, Manchester Twells, John, Esq., Highbury, Magistrate of the County of Middlesex White, Robert Guest, Army Accoutrement Maker, Dublin White, William Archibald Armstrong, Police Magistrate of London Wllson, George, Grocer, Overseer of the Poor, Westminster r 47 THE SELECT COMMITTEE appointed to inquire into the Extent, Causes, and Consequences of the prevailing vice of Intoxication among the Labouring Classes of the United Kingdom, in order to ascertain whether any Legislative Measures can be devised to prevent the further spread of so great a National Evil, and to whom the several Petitions presented to the House were referred, and who were empowered to report the Minutes of Evidence taken before them from time to time: --Have, pursuant to the Order of the House, proceeded to examine a great number and variety of witnesses from different parts of the United Kingdom, and in various ranks and professions of life, and have agreed to the following REPORT: I. Extent of the Evil. 1. That it appears to your Committee, from the evidence taken before them, that the vice of intoxication has been for some years past on the decline in the higher and middle ranks of society; but has increased within the same period among the labouring classes, and exists at present to a very great extent in the population of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and in the seaport and manufacturing towns, as well as in the agricultural districts, including in its victims, men, women, and even children. II. Remote Causes of its Production. 2. That among the remote causes of the intemperance which still prevails, may be enumerated, the influence of example set by the upper classes of society, when habits of intoxication were more frequent in such ranks than among..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236542207
  • 9781236542205