The Antiquities of Constantinople; With a Description of Its Situation, the Conveniencies of Its Port, Its Publick Buildings, the Statuary, Sculpture, Architecture, and Other Curiosities of That City. with Cuts Explaining the Chief of

The Antiquities of Constantinople; With a Description of Its Situation, the Conveniencies of Its Port, Its Publick Buildings, the Statuary, Sculpture, Architecture, and Other Curiosities of That City. with Cuts Explaining the Chief of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1729 edition. Excerpt: ...Image at present, yet they shew you an Image cut in Stone, which to this Day stands in the Eastern Part of the Temple of Fortune, before the Statue of Minerva. The Statue is carv'd in a War-like Posture, brandishing, as in Battle, a Spear, drefs'd in a long Garment, not representing the Statue of Minerva, as she is figured by the Greeks, but as described by lhe'AEgyptia?7s. The Inhabitants tell you, that Conflantine order'd this Statue, which was placed in the Forum, call'd by his own Name, to be bury'd under Ground. The Authorities that the Placoton and the Forum of Conjlantine are the fame Place ought to be regarded, because it is impossible to come to the Knowledge of four of the Wards without them; for the third Ward contains the Tribunal of the Forum of Conflantine; the sixth reaches from the Forum of Conjlantine, to the Stairs against Sycoe, where is erected the Pillar of Conjftantine. The seventh extends itself with continual Portico's from the Right Hand Side of the Pillar of Conflantine to the Forum of Theodofus, and the eighth contains part of the Forum Forum oiCmjlantine. When I was ajfk'd by some Gentlemen who were curious that way, how Ccnjlantine came by that Palladium, I answer'd, that I was at an Uncertainty as to that. For Zonaras's. Opinion of its being brought from 'Troy did not look very probable, since Troy was destroy'd so many Ages before it j and Straps hard put to it to trace out the Place of its Situation. The Story of its being brought from ancient Rome seems very improbable, since it was often destroy'd by Fire, and the Inhabitants were entirely ignorant where it originally stood. Yet the Latin Historians tell us, that Diomades presented it to AEneas, that it was kept for some time at Lavinium, and that it...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 92 pages
  • 185.42 x 243.84 x 7.62mm | 226.8g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236532872
  • 9781236532879