Annotated Cases, American and English; Containing the Important Cases Selected from the Current American, Canadian and English Reports, Thoroughly Annotated. V.1[1901]-40,1916c-1918e.

Annotated Cases, American and English; Containing the Important Cases Selected from the Current American, Canadian and English Reports, Thoroughly Annotated. V.1[1901]-40,1916c-1918e.

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ... namely. that every railroad company operatin a post road in the United States, over whic commerce among the states is carried on, was inhibited, after the Act of July 24, 1866, took efi'ect, from making any agreement inconsistent with its provisions or that tended to defeat its operations." The court added that it was very far from the intention of Congress by any legislation to so exert its power as to enable one telegraph corporation, Federal or state, to acquire exclusive rights over any post road. But now, a railroad corporation operating a post road, and wishing its right of way occupied only by a single company, with which it may have a special business arrangement, for its own purposes, need not make even a secret agreement granting exclusive privileges to that company. It need only keep silence and withhold its assent to the occupancy of its right of way by another company, and in that way give exclusive privileges to the company with which it has it may be to one organized wholly in the interest of the railroad company. In the Pensacola case it was said that one of-the objects of the Act of 1866 was to prevent state monopolies in telegraphic communication, and that the privilege granted by that act was a national privilege. Now, although state monopolies cannot exist, railroad monopolies in tele graphic communications may exist; and the national privilege granted by the Act of 1866 is left at the mercy of railroad companies operating the post roads of the United States. Practically, the railroad corporations operuting post roads--lookin, to their own interests and perhaps caring little for the general welfare----are recognized as now having more power than a state. I cannot assent to any interpretation of the Act of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 966 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 48mm | 1,687g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236881737
  • 9781236881731