Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the Earliest Period to the Year 1616; Ed. from the Autograph. Manuscript with a Transl. and Copious Notes by John O'Donovan Volume 3

Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the Earliest Period to the Year 1616; Ed. from the Autograph. Manuscript with a Transl. and Copious Notes by John O'Donovan Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ...THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1238. The Age of Cfirist, one thousand two hundred thirty-eight. Felix O'Rooney0, Archbishop of Tuam, after having some time before resigned his bishopric for the sake of God, and after having assumed the monastic habit in Kilmurry Mary's Abbey, in Dublin, died. Donough Uaithneach, son of Hugh, who was son of Roderic O'Conor, was slain by Teige, son of Hugh, who was son of Cathal Crovderg. Donough, son of Duarcan O'Hara, Lord of Leyny, was taken prisoner by Teige, the son of Hugh, who was son of Cathal Crovderg; and, while on his way to the place of confinement, he was killed in Hy-Briuin-na-Sinna, by his own kinsmen, namely, the sons of Hugh O'Hara. Flaherty Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, and Clann-Congail, and of Hy-Kennoda in Fermanagh, the most illustrious in Tyrone for feats of arms and hospitality, was treacherously slain by Donough Mac Cawell, his own kinsman. Donough, son of Murtough Mac Dermot, went into Breifny to O'Reilly, and brought a great force with him into Connaught, and plundered the people of Cluain-Coirpthid; and many of the chiefs of Muintir-Eolaise were slain in pursuit of the prey which had been taken in the country, as were also a great number of inhabitants of the Tuathas. Mulrony, the son of Donough O'Dowda, was slain by Melaghlin, the son of Colgan's Acta Sanctorum, at the 15th February, and the Irish Calendar of the O'Clerys, at the same day. St. Berach, or Barry, the original founder of this church, flourished about the year 580. The situation of Cluain Coirpthe, which has been mistaken by Archdall, and even by the accurate Dr. Lanigan (see his Ecclesiastical History, vol. ii. p. 325), is still well known to the natives of Kinel-Dofa, in the county of Roscommon. It is now called Kilbarry, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 244 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 440g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236821734
  • 9781236821737