The Annals of England, an Epitome of English History, from Contemporary Writers, the Rolls of Parliament, and Other Public Records Volume 1

The Annals of England, an Epitome of English History, from Contemporary Writers, the Rolls of Parliament, and Other Public Records Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1855 edition. Excerpt: ...themselves under the guidance of Peter the Hermit and his lieutenant, Walter the Pennyless, advanced as early as March from the borders of the Rhine, but after suffering innumerable hardships they were cut off at their very entrance into Asia by the Sultan of Nice; Walter fell among them, but Peter found shelter at Constantinople. About the appointed time, the main army of the crusaders started, and passing, some through Germany, Hungary, and the Greek dominions, others through Italy and then by sea, they rendezvoused at Constantinople in May, 1097. Their chief leaders were Godfrey of Bouillon, the duke of Lorraine, accompanied by his brothers Eustace and Baldwin11; Raymond, count of Toulouse, and Adhemar, bishop of Puy, the papal legate; the Norman princes Bohemond of Tarentum and his nephew Tancred; Robert, son of William of 1 The-" were the sons of Eustace of Boulogne, already mentioned. See pp. 140,185. Normandy, and Stephen of Chartres, his brother-inlaw; Robert, count of FJander3, and Hugh, count of Vermandois, brother of Philip I. of France. The aid of the nations of the West had been invoked by the Emperor Alexius, but when it came, his fears were roused, and he only consented to furnish the means of transport across the narrow channel of Constantinople after the leaders had done homage to him, and promised to hold any conquests they might make as fiefs of his empire. This point settled, the host advanced; its numbers cannot be accurately ascertained, but it is stated by a cotemporary who was present (Fulcher of Chartres) at 600,000 men able to bear arms, beside a multitude of priests and monks, and women and children. Nice, the scene of the destruction of the first body of pilgrims, was besieged and taken before the end of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 116 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 222g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236807561
  • 9781236807564