Annals of the Astronomical Observatory of Harvard College Volume 43

Annals of the Astronomical Observatory of Harvard College Volume 43

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...precipitation, thunder and lightning, optical phenomena, etc., are recorded, so far as possible, and the degree of visibility of mountains to the westward is observed twice a day. Continuous automatic records are maintained of the following elements: atmospheric pressure (on daily, weekly, and monthly sheets), air-temperature and relative humidity, winddirection and velocity (distance travelled and rate), precipitation, bright sunshine (daily and weekly records), and cloudiness at night in the vicinity of the pole star. The two secondary stations are situated below the Observatory and north-northwest of it: one at the base of Great Blue Hill, at the residence of Mr. Clayton; and the other, which is managed by Mrs. H. M. Dean, in the Neponset Valley. In May, 1902, the latter station was removed from the land of the Metropolitan Park, on the bank of the Neponset River, to a new site, about a quarter of a mile westnorthwest, but less than ten feet higher. In July, 1902, a recording Robinson anemometer was placed on the roof of Mr. Dean's house. There are thermographs at both stations, but a recording rain-gauge is maintained only at the Base Station. Daily record sheets are used on the rain-gauge and on the thermograph in the valley, and weekly sheets on the other instruments. Hygrometric records are now obtained at the Valley Station only when kite-flights are made. Direct readings of the maximum and minimum thermometers are made also at these stations at 8 P.M., and the precipitation is measured at the end of the storm. At all the stations the automatic records are controlled by the direct readings of the standard instruments. A summary of the observations is sent each month to the United States Weather Bureau for publication in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236903552
  • 9781236903556