Animal Kingdom; Arranged According So Its Organization, Forming the Basis for a Natural History of Animals, and Inroduction to Comparative Anatomy

Animal Kingdom; Arranged According So Its Organization, Forming the Basis for a Natural History of Animals, and Inroduction to Comparative Anatomy

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1840 edition. Excerpt: ...in which all the whorls are visible. Their syphon is near the margin. They have been still further distinguished into those which have the margins of the septa foliaceous, (the Ammanito, the Planitei of Haan, ) and into those in which they are simply angular and undulatory (the Ceratitet of Haan). Those in which the last whorl envelopes all the others, are the Ortnditei, Lam., or the Globites and Goniatites of Haan, or Pclogutet, Montf. The syphon is the same as in Ammonites. The name Scaphites, Sowerby, or rather of Parkinson, has been appropriated to those species whose whorls are contiguous and on the same plane, excepting the last, which is detached and bent upon itself. Those which are perfectly straight are the Baculitet, Lam. Some are round, others are compressed; and in the latter we sometimes observe the syphon to be lateral. The Hamites of Sowerby, Parkinson, are known by having their first formed cells arcuated. But the Turrilitft, Montf., differ more than any from the usual habit of the family, ' for the whorls, in place of remaining on the same level, descend rapidly, and give to the shell that obelisk form which is denominated turriculated. "-' From analogy, it is supposed that we ought to refer to the Cephalopoda, and to consider as being internal shells The Camerinks, Brug. (Nummulitet, Lam.), --For all of them are equally fossil. They have a lenticular shape, without any apparent aperture, but within there is a spiral cavity, divided by septa into a multitude of little chambers without a syphon. They are amongst the most generally diffused fossils, and almost of themselves form some entire chains of calcareous hills, and immense banks of building stone. (It is upon such rocks that the pyramids of Egypt are founded, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 518 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 26mm | 916g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123654174X
  • 9781236541741