The Anglo-Saxon Race; Its History, Character, and Destiny. an Address Before the Syracuse University, at Commencement, June 21, 1875 Volume 1-10

The Anglo-Saxon Race; Its History, Character, and Destiny. an Address Before the Syracuse University, at Commencement, June 21, 1875 Volume 1-10

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ...p. 182. 9 We have further proof of this in such a passage as the following: --"Do not all as much and more wonder at God's rare workmanship in the ant, the poorest buy that creeps, as in the biggest elephant?"--ROGERS, Naaman the Syrian, p. 74. 3 GELL, Essay toward the Amendment of the English Translation qf the Bible, p. 336. ' The Light of Natuvre, c. 4. 5 " The Latin language was judged not to have come to its am, or flourishing height of elegance, until the age in which Cicero lived."---3rd ed. 1671. 6 "Another degree or rank of animate or living creatures there is, which the Grecians call a6centsv1-a."--JAcKs0N, Christ's Everlasting Priesthood, b. 10, c. 25, 2. 7 " I mean the common principles of Christianity, and those d u 1p.a-ra which men use in the transactions of the ordinary occurrences of civil society/'--J. TAYLOR, The Liberty cf Prophesyiny, Epistle Dedicatory. nomenon, '1 ' criterion, ' ' zoology," ' pathos, '3 'chrysalis,"' 'apotheosis, '5 ' ophthalmia, '5 'metropolis, '7 ' prolegomena, '8 tell in the same way the same story. Or, once more, if I notice that at a certain epoch of the language not one but many writers employ ' individuum, '9 where we should speak of an 'individual, ' I am justified in concluding that however, as an adjective, it may have been for some time current among us, it had not gained an independent existence, and a noun substautive's right to stand alone. Bacon' s use of it as equivalent to ' atom' is merely technical. ' Skeleton, ' which according to its etymology meant ashow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236749979
  • 9781236749970