Anatomy of the Heart, Cranium, and Brain; Adapted to the Purposes of the Medical and Surgical Practitioner; To Which Is Added, in Notes, Observations on the Laws of Life and Sensation

Anatomy of the Heart, Cranium, and Brain; Adapted to the Purposes of the Medical and Surgical Practitioner; To Which Is Added, in Notes, Observations on the Laws of Life and Sensation

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1813 edition. Excerpt: ... mater is diffused, as the tomentum cerebri. This conformation seems to present the greatest given diffusion of vascularity, in the smallest given space. On the action of these vessels the phenomena of the sensorium commune perhaps depends. The hemispheres assume the shape of half an egg, the small end anterior; and we form to ourselves a tolerable correct idea of their vertical regions, (which terminate in the corpus callosum), by supposing a longitudinal section ofthis egg shape, which will represent the vertical region, (Plate VII. IX. c e). These correspond to the falx, (Plate VIII. h), the falx being insinuated between the hemispheres. The falx of Plate VIII. however is evidently unconnected with the hemispheres at (d e), about aquarter of an inch above the corpus callosum'; hence the pia mater is apt to coalesce, and when the operator separates the hemispheres, to look down on the corpus callosum, (Plate VIII.), he is apt to mistake the laceration of the hemispheres for the corpus callosum; but he must continue till he discovers a purely defined white body. The veins ofthis (Plate VII. d), previous to separation, entered the longitudinal sinus of the Plate VIII. below, seen at The hand is introduced in this plate to exhibit the left half of the corpus callosum, on which the left hemisphere rested, the other hemisphere in situ_ covering the right side of the corpus callosum; the little finger presses back the falx and right lobe, while the thumb displaces the left. Where water is suspected in the ventricles (which shall be after I FOURTH STAGE OF THE DISSECTION OF THE BRAIN. 35 wards described), the operator ought to be cautious in the manner of separating the hemispheres, as the corpus callosum is apt to be lacerated; and where...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236969014
  • 9781236969019