An Analysis of the Roman Civil Law; In Which a Comparison Is, Occasionally, Made Between the Roman Laws and Those of England Being the Heads of a Course of Lectures, Publickly Read in the University of Cambridge. the Second Edition. by

An Analysis of the Roman Civil Law; In Which a Comparison Is, Occasionally, Made Between the Roman Laws and Those of England Being the Heads of a Course of Lectures, Publickly Read in the University of Cambridge. the Second Edition. by

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1775 edition. Excerpt: ...A. R, ? L4b, III.Tit, Vol.1. Ch. 13.--El.j.C. J 23--27. Wood's/)?/? of Laws of England. Wood's Inst, of Ciu. Law. B. B. II. Ch. i. HI. Ch. c. Blackstone's Comm. B. II. Ch. Taylor's EL ofCiv. Law: art. 3. 6.9. 12. 3'Q., Property, p. 479--496. i./CONSENSUAL Cqntracts were those, in which the Consent alone of the Parties perfected the Obligation. These were five in number. I. Emptiq Venditio, II. Locatio Conductiq. III. Em PtfYTEUSIS. IV. SoCIETAS, V. Mandatum. 2. I. Emptio Venditio, or Buying and Selling, js a Contract, by which Goods are delivered from one man to another, for a certain Price. 3, The Price of Things is their comparative value. The inconveniences of adjusting such value by the method of Permutation or Exchange occasioned the introduction of a common Standard, called Money. 4. An 4. An implied Warranty was annexed to every Sale, in respect to the Title of the Seller. Goods, sold without the owner's consent, were sometimes taken.from the Buyer, and redelivered to the Proprietor, by the sentence of the Judge: Such a Judicial Recovery of what another had acquired by a legal Title was called Eviction. 5. In England, no Contract for the sale of Goods, worth ten pounds or upwards, is valid; except the Buyer receives part of the Goods, or gives something to the Seller by way of Earnest, or unless some Note of the bargain in Writing be signed by the Parties, or their Agents. 6. Addictio in Diem, PaElum CommiJJorium, Jus Retrattus five retrovendendi; explained. 7. II. Locatio Conductio, or Letting and Hiring, is a Contract, by which the Use of a Thing, or the Labour of a Person, is granted by one man to another, for a certain time, in consideration of a certain Rent. 8. If the Hirer died before the Expiration of his Term, the remaining part was...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 50 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236649486
  • 9781236649485