An Analysis of Gothic Architecture; Illustrated by a Series of Upwards of Seven Hundred Examples of Doorways, Windows Etc., and Accompanied with Rema

An Analysis of Gothic Architecture; Illustrated by a Series of Upwards of Seven Hundred Examples of Doorways, Windows Etc., and Accompanied with Rema

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ... greater richness of detail: thus, when shafts were employed, they carried groups of moldings more elaborate than those of the jambs, though still falling upon the same planes; as in the west doorway of North Mimms Church, Herts. (Section I. Decorated, Plate 25.) During the continuance of the Norman, Early English, and Decorated periods, it was the invariable practice, in the case of arches dividing the nave from the aisles, or the Chancel from its adjoining chapels, to keep them entirely distinct from the piers on which they were carried: these latter were frequently simply circular, or octagonal, while the arches were most elaborately molded or enriched, as in New Shoreham Church. (Section I. SemiNorman, Plate 3.) Even when both members were equally ornamented, as in the magnificent examples in St Patrick's, Patrington, their separate characters were nevertheless preserved; while in Perpendicular, on the contrary, we may perceive a much closer connection to exist between them. The piers and arches given in Section I. Perpendicular, Plate 14, show the arrangement generally adopted at this period; shafts placed at the cardinal points of the pier supported part of the arch moldings, the remainder being continuous and common to both members. Capitals were either molded or carved with foliage, animals, etc.; they always, however, consisted of three distinct parts, which require to be most strictly kept in view, if we would preserve the peculiar character of this important feature. These three divisions of the capital may be described as the head mold A, the bell B, and the neck mold C. In Norman capitals the head mold was, almost without exception, square on plan, and consisted of a few simply arranged moldings; in the richer examples this member...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 50 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236603818
  • 9781236603814