Analysis of a Course of Lecures on Natural and Experimental Philosophy; Viz. 1. Properties of Matter, 2. Mechanics. 3. Chemistry, 4 and 5. Pneumatics, 6. Hydrostatics, 7. Electricity, 8. Electricity, 9. Optics, 10. Use of the Globes & C.,

Analysis of a Course of Lecures on Natural and Experimental Philosophy; Viz. 1. Properties of Matter, 2. Mechanics. 3. Chemistry, 4 and 5. Pneumatics, 6. Hydrostatics, 7. Electricity, 8. Electricity, 9. Optics, 10. Use of the Globes & C.,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1798 edition. Excerpt: ... 7. The pressure of a fluid upon the bottoms of all vessels whatever, it proportional to their bases and perpendicular height, without any regard to the quantities they contain; for if on a loose piston suspended on a balance, a column of water of a foot be weighed, it will be found to weigh as much as a column of water of the fame height, though contained in a flanging vessel that holds ten times as much. 8. If a small tube be joined to a very large one, and the whole be bent in the bottom so as the two parts may be either parallel, or make any angle, water may be poured into either tube, and it will just rise as high in the other, even tho' one should contain ten thousand times as much as the other does: This also shews that fluids press in proportion to their perpendicular heights, without any regard to their quantities; that water in pipes will ascend to the level of the Jfring from whence it came; and that jets or fountains would rise the same height, if not obstructed by angular turnings, and the rejijlance if the air into which they play. Smoke does riot rise into air because of its positive levity, but because it is lighter than the air where it is produced; hence if the small neck of a bolthead, sull of water, be mmersed in a glass of wine, the lighter wine will ascend up into the bolthead, and the heavier water descend into the glass. For the fame reason, a body specifically (or bulk for bulk) heavier than water will sink in it; a body of the fame weight will lie indifferently any where in it; and one specifically lighter will of course swira in it. Smoke is forced up a chimney by the air in the room, pressing to the rarefied air in the chimney;---hence, the patent stoves, contracting the fire-place, obliges the air to rush in with...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236594584
  • 9781236594587