Americanized Encyclopaedia Britannica; REV. and Amended a Dictionary of Arts, Sciences and Literature, to Which Is Added Biographies of Living Subjects. 96 Colored Maps and Numerous Illustrations Volume 4

Americanized Encyclopaedia Britannica; REV. and Amended a Dictionary of Arts, Sciences and Literature, to Which Is Added Biographies of Living Subjects. 96 Colored Maps and Numerous Illustrations Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1890 edition. Excerpt: ...'n '77 the thirteen colonies united in the Congress issued their Declaration of Independence. England put forth ill its strength to beat down resistance. She increased her armies by hirelings bought from the German princes Hut not only did no military genius appear on the Eng. lish side, but the distance across the Atlantic was so great, and the immense spaces of even the settled part of the American continent were so large, that it was impossible to effect that conquest which seemed soeay at a distance. The difficulties of the Americans, too, were enormous, but they had the advantage of being at home; and in Washington they found a leader worthy of the great cause for which he fought. In 1777 a British army under Burgoyne capitulated at Saratoga; and in the same year France, eager to revenge the disasters of the Seven Years' War, formed an alliance with the revolted colonies as free and independent states, and was soon joined by Spain. Chatham, who was ready to make any concession to America short of independence, and especially of independence at the dictation of France, died in 1778. The war was continued for some years with varying results; but in I78l, the capitulation of a second British army under Cornwallis at Yorktown was a decisive blow, which brought home to the minds of the dullest the assurance that the conquest of America was an impossibility. Before this event happened there had been a great change in public feeling in England. The increasing weight of taxation gave rise in 1780, to a great meeting of the freeholders of Yorkshire, which in tum gave the signal for a general agitation for the reduction of unnecessary expense in the government. To this desire Burke gave expression in his bill for economical reform, though he...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 812 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 41mm | 1,420g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236814347
  • 9781236814340