The American Universal Geography; Or, a View of the Present State of All the Kingdoms, States, and Colonies in the Known World

The American Universal Geography; Or, a View of the Present State of All the Kingdoms, States, and Colonies in the Known World

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1812 edition. Excerpt: ...8100,000 for the erection of a bridge at Columbia; g 100,000 for another at Harrisburg; and 850,000 for another at Northumberland; all over the Susquehannah. Canals. It has long been an object of contemplation to establish a water communication between lake Erie and Philadelphia. The country was surveyed in 1790 by public commissioners, who proposed the following route, the whole distance of which is 561 miles. Up the Schuylkill to Reading; thence to the head waters of the Tulpchockcn, which were to be connected by a canal with those of the Quitapahiila a branch of the Swetara, and down this last to the Susqucbamiah; thence up the Susquehannah, the Juniata, and the Frankstown branch, to Frank's Old town; thence by a canal to Poplar Run, and by a portage of 18 miles across the mountains to the Little Conncmaugh, and down that river and the Kiskemanitas to the Allegany; thence up the Allegany and French creek to Lc Bocuf; and thence by a portage of 15 miles to the lake. Attempts have been made to complete the two first stages since 1791; but hitherto, owing to the want of funds, they have not been completed. At the Conewago falls in the Susquehannah, in the gap of the Blue Ridge, the descent of which is 19 feet, a canal has been completed for several years 1 mile in length; expense 14,000. Manufactures. Necessary tradesmen and mechanics, viz. shoe makers, tailors, weavers, carpenters, joiners, masons, coopers, smiths, canwrights, tanners, and saddlers are settled on small farms or lots throughout the improved country; several are also found together in villages; but this mode is more customary in the thickly peopled parts, which cannot support many of a sort. Manufacturers, for whom there is less comparative demand, dwell chiefly in the towns, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 404 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 21mm | 717g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236578082
  • 9781236578082