The American Universal Cyclopaedia; A Complete Library of Knowledge, a Reprint of the Last Edinburgh and London Edition of Chambers's Encyclopaedia, W

The American Universal Cyclopaedia; A Complete Library of Knowledge, a Reprint of the Last Edinburgh and London Edition of Chambers's Encyclopaedia, W

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ...Hungarian family. Ha was in the Presburg diet, 1847-48; lord-lieutenant of Zemplen co.; and led the militia against the Austrians. He was Hungarian envoy to Turkey, and, 1849-57, an exile in France and England. Returning home, he was a member of the diet in 1861, and its vice-president 1865-66. After the recognition of Hungary as a part of the Austrian empire, Deak procured the appointment of A. as prime minister Feb. 17, 1867, and he led a popular and reforming administration, working for the political emancipation of the Jews and against the temporal power of the pope. He succeeded count Beust, Nov. 9, 1871, as minister of foreign affairs, holding the place until Aug. 18, 1879, when his resignation was accepted. ANDEE, John, anunfortunate soldier, who met his death under circumstance which have given his name a place in history, was b. in London, in 1751, of Gcnevese parents. At the age of 20, he entered the army, and soon after joined the British forces in America, where, in a few years, through the favor of Sir Henry Clinton, he was promoted to the important post of adjutant-general, with the rank of major. Sir Henry Clinton being in treaty with the American gen. Arnold, who commanded the fortress of West Point, for the betrayal to the British of the fortress, with its magazines, including the whole stock of powder of the American army, confided the conduct of the correspondence on his part to Major A. The secret correspondence was conducted by Arnold and A. under assumed names, and as if it related to commercial affaire; and the treachery was so well concealed, that the Americans had no suspicion whatever of Arnold's fidelity. At last it remained only to settle the time and means of carrying the scheme into execution; and these, it was...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 812 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 41mm | 1,420g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236611012
  • 9781236611017