American Unitarian Biography; Memoirs of Individuals Who Have Been Distinguished by Their Writings, Character, and Efforts in the Cause of Liberal Christianity Volume 2

American Unitarian Biography; Memoirs of Individuals Who Have Been Distinguished by Their Writings, Character, and Efforts in the Cause of Liberal Christianity Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ...address, might be heard only with patience. But no man could pretend to look down on the intellectual powers of Mr. Buckminster. No man, from any confidence in his own superior discernment, could pretend to regard with disrespect what he reverenced, or to think lightly of what he made the rule of his life, and the foundation of his hopes. If I were to mention any virtues as peculiarly characteristic of Mr. Buckminster, one would be that manliness of mind, which no applause broke down into any displays of vanity or affectation, which made no sacrifices of honesty or of propriety to acquire any man's favor, and which impressed all, who knew him, with unconstrained respect. Another would be his forgetfulness of self; so that by the frequent attacks of an alarming disease he was never subdued into complaint or despondence. He could not but have looked forward with some of those apprehensions which all, who knew him, felt; but they did not interrupt his exertions, or destroy his cheerfulness, or diminish his interest in the welfare of his friends, and of all whom he had the power to benefit. I have said that he was not insensible to the prospect that he had but a short time to do good to his fellow-men. Few of those who heard him on the day of the interment of Mr. Emerson, which took place but about a year before he himself was carried to the grave, have forgotten the prophetic foreboding which escaped him of his own death. That day was rendered yet more gloomy by our witnessing in him the symptoms of disease, and by a sense of the personal feeling, with which he must have quoted the words of the Poet, in speaking of his departed brother: --"O! 'tis well With him. But who knows what the coming hour, Veil'd in thick darkness, brings for -s." There...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 116 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 222g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236668731
  • 9781236668738