American Stationary Engineering; Facts, Rules and General Information Gathered from Thirty Years' Practical Experience as Running, Erecting and Designing Engineer

American Stationary Engineering; Facts, Rules and General Information Gathered from Thirty Years' Practical Experience as Running, Erecting and Designing Engineer

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ... side of this engine is built. On the opposite side are the steam valves, also piston valves. This engine has a large clearance, but the chief defect is in the exhaust outlet. It will be noticed that this is in the center. All the Water in Cylinders. condensed water from the top is thrown to the bottom. When the bottom valve ooens, the water from both top and bottom must pass upward and turn the right angle with the steam to get out. This it will do if the engine is loaded and the exhaust passages are filled with steam. When the engine has a light load the water falls back, enters the bottom of the cylinder and makes all kind of trouble. This engine has pistons with conical faces, and the bottom head is a beautiful water-pocket. It is a delight for the engineer to take care of the rod packing and scoop up the water that is thrown in all directions. The maker of metallic packing for this engine has little peace in life. The valves being of the piston type, there is no escape for the water except such as has gone down the rods, and there are cracked pistons, and broken journal cap bolts, these apparently being the weaker part of the engine. A section of the low-pressure piston is shown in Fig. 63. The piston is a single casting with a rebate joint for junk ring, and the follower is a ring of metal held in position with tap bolts. The distress in this cylinder from water showed itself in the loosening and breaking of these tap bolts. This engine drives a railway generator. The cars are of the 60-seat type, and run at regular railroad speed. The schedule is such that for about one-half hour the cars are at the terminal stations or on down grades. At such times the pistons pounding on the water at the bottom of the cylinders is a delight to mechanical...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236564014
  • 9781236564016