The American Rose Culturist; Being a Practical Treatise on the Propogation, Cultivation, and Management of the Rose in All Seasons; With a List of Cho

The American Rose Culturist; Being a Practical Treatise on the Propogation, Cultivation, and Management of the Rose in All Seasons; With a List of Cho

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...this, it would grow incongruously, and would not be controllable. On the other hand, if you have two of similar habit, and opposite colors, it may be made a very pretty object. But the great value of this delicate, though simple operation, is to make an old China, or other strong-growing Rose, long established, change its face altogether. Many kinds of roses may be budded on such a tree, by selecting all_ the strong-growing branches of the present year's growth, putting a different bud in each, and cutting all the other parts of the tree away, leaving the novelties alone to grow; or the buds may be all of the same sort, so it be some choice kind; but different colored roses have the best effect. Spring Buddi.ng.--But one of the most sure and expeditious methods is that called "spring budding," by which the bark of the stoclg as early in the season as it will separate from the wood, is cut like the letter T inverted, (thus;, ) as shown by a, in the adjoining figuref whereas, in "summer budding," it forms a T in its erect position. The horizontal edges of this cut in the stock, and of the "shield bar " containing the bud, should be brought into the most perfect contact, as denoted by 12," because the union of the bark in spring takes place by means of the ascent of the sap; whereas, in summer budding, it is supposed to be caused by its descent. The parts should then immediately be bound with water-proof bass, (c, ) without applying either grafting clay or grafting wax. The buds may be inserted either in a healthful branch, or in a stock near the ground. In general, two buds are sufficient for one stock, and these should be of the same variety; as two sorts seldom grow with equal vigor. The bass...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236851145
  • 9781236851147