American Rights & British Pretensions on the Seas; The Facts and the Documents, Official and Other, Bearing Upon the Present Attitude of Great Britain Toward the Commerce of the United States

American Rights & British Pretensions on the Seas; The Facts and the Documents, Official and Other, Bearing Upon the Present Attitude of Great Britain Toward the Commerce of the United States

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ... Diplomatic Correspondence, etc. The New York Times, November 24, 1914. First. The most vital modifications of the Declaration of London are contained in the rule concerning conditional contraband under Nos. 3 and 5 of the above-mentioned Order in Council. Article 33 of the Declaration of London defines that there can be no question of conditional contraband except in the case where cargo is destined for the use of the administrative departments or the military forces of the hostile power. Moreover, according to Article 35 the question whether goods arc conditional contraband or not can under no circumstances arise when the vessel is sailing for a neutral port. The above provisions which are, in the main, in accordance with the accepted rules of international law and represent the outcome of the just weighing of the interests of the belligerents on the one side and of the neutral countries on the other side, are as good as annulled by the said Order in Council, for, according to its No. 3 the hostile destination of the cargo is to be presumed in every case where the consignee of the cargo is under the control of the authorities of the hostile State. This, however, means nothing else but that each and every cargo shipped to the hostile country is liable to be seized because all inhabitants of that country are under the control of the authorities. This rule is supplemented by No. 5 of the said Order, which sets forth that all vessels on the voyage for neutral ports are liable to be seized for having conditional contraband on board. Thus, the rule of the continuous voyage, applicable only in the case of absolute contraband, is declared applicable also with regard to conditional contraband in contravention of Article 35 of the Declaration of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 132 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 249g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236756258
  • 9781236756251