American Photography; A Continuation of American Amateur Photographer ... Camera and Dark Room ... Photo Beacon ... Camera Notes ... Volume 9

American Photography; A Continuation of American Amateur Photographer ... Camera and Dark Room ... Photo Beacon ... Camera Notes ... Volume 9

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ...like to carry "so much book" around. The monthly light tables, occupying twelve pages in the book, arc reduced to a single table, as follows: The light factors given in this table correspond to the classification A, or bright sunlight. The correct exposure for any other light factor can be determined from this table. To illustrate, let us suppose the following conditions: April, between 8 A. M. and 9 A. M., strong foreground (Factor 1), bright sunlight. Referring to the table, the light factor is seen to be / . Revolve the disc until the subject factor (1) coincides with the light factor. The correct exposure is found opposite the plate factor. So far the method is the same as when the complete book is used. Now let us suppose the conditions arc the same, excepting that we are working on a day the light factor of which is (B). Set the subject factor (1) one place to the left of the bright sunlight factor, and so on; that is, for light factor C, two places to the left; light factor D, three places to the left, and light factor E, four places to the left. In this plan, the whole meter can be contained in two parts--the table and the revolving disc--in an ordinary card case.--Geo. H. Rowe. Flashlight Interiors.--In making flashlights of interiors the photographer occasionally finds himself between the devil and the deep sea. To secure depti of focus or sharpness of detail in all parts of the picture, he must stop down to a considerable extent, but in so doing he makes necessary an increase of the intensity of the flash to offset the decrease in aperture. His other alternative is to use a larger aperture, sacrificing sharpness, but permitting the use of a smaller flash. For example, I recently made some daylight interiors of a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 310 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 558g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236770358
  • 9781236770356