The American Negligence Cases; Cited Am. Neg. Cas. a Complete Collection of All Reported Negligence Cases Decided in the United States Supreme Court

The American Negligence Cases; Cited Am. Neg. Cas. a Complete Collection of All Reported Negligence Cases Decided in the United States Supreme Court

By (author) 

List price: US$22.39

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...customers of the bank one class of United States bonds to be converted into another is not within the scope of the powers conferred by this act. Ve are not informed by the record as to the acts that were necessary to have been done by the bank in order to " convert" bonds of the govemment from one class to another. It may have been done by forwarding the bonds to be converted to the proper ofiicer of the government, and receiving from him in return their equivalent in a different series; or it may have been accomplished by their sale and thepurchase of the kind desired. Ve think the bank, under the provisions of the act above cited, was clothed with authority to pursue either course in order to " convert " the bonds of its customers. It was authorized to receive deposits. It cannot be doubted that it might have received deposits of United States bonds, and certainly such deposits could have been received under a contract to return bonds of another class in their place. It was empowered to purchase and sell such bonds, and undoubtedly it was within the limits of its power to sell plaintiff's bonds when deposited with it, and buy others to be returned in their place. "Fe are unable to see why these transactions may not have taken place with the proper ofiicer of the government, the bank delivering to him one class of bonds and receiving in return another. It is the policy of the government to encourage the purchase and sale of its bonds and to facilitate transactions in them, for thereby their value will be enhanced and the credit of the government in a measure promoted. It is not probable that Congress intended to impose restrictions upon the national banks, the most numerous class of financial agentsin the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 392 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 21mm | 699g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236781503
  • 9781236781505