American Municipalities; Accounting, Paving, Street Cleaning, Sewers and Sewage, Municipal Law ... Volume 12

American Municipalities; Accounting, Paving, Street Cleaning, Sewers and Sewage, Municipal Law ... Volume 12

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ... of minimum rates. based partly on size of meter anid nartly on previous flat-rates was put in effect, the object of this being to avoid too great a reduction in revenue. while at the same time giving the small consumer a minimum rate that should not be greater than his flat rate. Threequarters llI'Cl1 and larger meters paid $10 ner annum as above; five-eigh-ts inch, where the flat rate had been over $8, paid $6 and $5 to $8 flflzf rates paid $5 minimum rate. Later all minimum rates on five--eights inch meters were replaced by a $5 rate for those whose flat rates had e.'ceedcd $5 and $2.50 for those less than $5. In this connection I wish to state that it has been Cleveland's good fortune to have intelligently made ra-tes. Based in beginning on cost of plant, together with estimated cost of 'operation. as all rates should be. have never been increased. but steadily reduced as surplus revenue exceeded demands for new construction. F1-at rates higher than meter rates for small cornsumers, made introduction of meter system easy. Of the total revenue for 1900, $765,511.95, $327,046.94, or about 43 per cent was from meters, showing that the largest consumers had been effectively reached. Consumption in that year, however, and for several years before had been many times uncomfortably close to pumping capacity, and what was more serious, it was becoming apparent that the continuance of the rate of increase for the previous ten years, would cause the average daily pumpagev to exceed the capacity of the new nine-foot i-n.take, not then completed, within the next ten years. This oould only have been met by resorting to the old intake, which was even then furnishing water that was of doubtful quality at times of high water in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 232 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 422g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236961226
  • 9781236961228