The American Merino; For Wool and for Mutton a Practical Treatise on the Selection, Care, Breeding, and Diseases of the Merino Sheep in All Sections of United States

The American Merino; For Wool and for Mutton a Practical Treatise on the Selection, Care, Breeding, and Diseases of the Merino Sheep in All Sections of United States

By (author) 

List price: US$6.23

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ...corn, which will show its effects for years afterward. It makes an excellent top-dressing for weak places in the meadows, but it has to be scattered on in winter and exposed to the frosts and rains two or three months, after which a man with a stout dung-fork can fine it without much difiiculty. SHEEP LOSING WO0L.--There will often be noticed a sheep whose wool is ragged along the sides, with little locks pulled out and hanging; sometimes long seams showing in the fleece where the wool has wholly parted from the skin on the surface of wrinkles and fallen off. In searching for the causes of this loss of wool, the shepherd must first assure himself that there are no sharp edges, points, pins or nails about the racks or sides of the stable. Then let him watch the ragged-looking sheep and see if it is not addicted to the vice of " wool-biting." It is thought by many shepherds that this is caused by an eruption and itching of the skin, produced by ammoniacal vapors and the heat of fermentation in the manure. The following facts may be set down as established, respecting the habit of wool-biting: --1. Young sheep are seldom addicted to it. 2. Sheep on grass never pull out their wool. 3. Sheep fed in winter on laxative feeds, as fodder, roots, bran, etc., are less inclined to the habit than those kept exclusively on hay and corn. Sulphur in the salt mitigates, to some extent, its manifestations. Nevertheless, there are some sheep which, whether it is an idiosyncrasy with them, the result of a thin and sensitive skin, or a vice, are so addicted to wool-biting every winter that they ought to be dismissed from the farm. Where wool is seen to peel off from the outer smface of wrinkles, it may be accepted as evidence of chilling having...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 254g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236845811
  • 9781236845818