The American Laborer, Devoted to the Cause of Protection to Home Industry, Embracing the Arguments, Reports and Speeches of the Ablest Civilians of the United States in Favor of the Protection to American Labor, with the Volume 1

The American Laborer, Devoted to the Cause of Protection to Home Industry, Embracing the Arguments, Reports and Speeches of the Ablest Civilians of the United States in Favor of the Protection to American Labor, with the Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843 edition. Excerpt: ...cost us more than they should have done. My profession left me little time even to direct. Most of the work was done by a German gardener, who labored in the cocooncry about half the time, and in the garden the other half. I would state the account thus: 'I'otal.............-$8000 '.. This is a very small experiment. fies me that our farmers might make silk culture, in connection with their other business, profitable. Their children might do the work, and thus they might easily realize from one to five hundred dollars per annum, and scarcely feel the loss of time. A silk worm lives but a month, and cats but little, except the last week of that month. Having thus given to you the result of my rear-ings, both of the mulberry tree and of the silk worm, I proceed, pursuant to your request, to add a few observations and "suggestions." First: Silk worms want a dry atmosphere. Hence the silk of China, and of the United States, is the finest in the world. The silk regions of France and Italy are shielded by mountain ranges from sea breezes. Second: The rnorus multicaulis will endure our winters. It is more easily propagated than the White mulberry, or any other variety---is equally hardy---is preferred by the worms, and makes as good, but, I think, not better silk than the white. Third: The labor-Qf producing and reeling silk may all be performed by aged persons, females and children. It is light, pleasant and healthful employment. Fourth: The quantity of land required is very little; four acres would produce foliage enough for four hundred dollars per annum. Fifth: Our country is now ripe for the experiment, and the next five years must decide the question, whether the mulberry trees, now happily spread over almost every county...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 352 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 19mm | 630g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236977084
  • 9781236977083