The American Flora, or History of Plants and Wild Flowers Containing a Systematic and General Description, Natural History, Chemical and Medical Properties of Over Six Thousand Plants Volume 2

The American Flora, or History of Plants and Wild Flowers Containing a Systematic and General Description, Natural History, Chemical and Medical Properties of Over Six Thousand Plants Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ...Gen. Char. Calyx, none. Corolla, four-cleft, withering, enclosing the stamens. Drupe, one-seeded. Spe. Char. Flowers, sessile, in threes on the stem. Leaves, lanceolate, deciduous. The Mezereon is a hardy shrub, which usually grows to the height of five or six feet, and sends off several branches; the exterior bark is smooth, and of a gray color; the root is of a fibrous texture, of a pale color, and covered with smooth olive-colored bark; the leaves are few, tender, lance-shaped, sessile, deciduous, and appear at the terminations of the branches, after the flowers have expanded; thejlowers surround the branches in thick clusters; they are sessile, monopetalous, tubular, having the limb divided into four oval, spreading segments, generally of a purple color; the stamens are eight, alternately shorter, and concealed within the tube of the corolla; the style is very short, the stigma flat, and the germen, which is oval, becomes a reddish berry, containing a round seed. This shrub is a native of England, though not very common. We are informed that it grows wild in the woods near Andover in Hampshire, and also about Loxfield in Suffolk; but it is generally cultivated in gardens, on account of the beauty and earliness of its flowers, which appear in February and March. This plant is extremely acrid, especially when fresh; and if Vol. ii.--95 retained in the mouth, excites great and long continued heat and inflammation, particularly of the throat and fauces. The berries also have the same effects, and, when swallowed, prove a powerful corrosive poison, not only to man, but to dogs, wolves, foxes, &c. The bark and berries of Mezereon, in different forms, have been long externally used in obstinate ulcers and sores. In France and some parts of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236506316
  • 9781236506313