The American Farmer's Encyclopedia; Embracing All the Recent Discoveries in Agricultural Chemistry, and the Use of Mineral, Vegetable and Animal Manur

The American Farmer's Encyclopedia; Embracing All the Recent Discoveries in Agricultural Chemistry, and the Use of Mineral, Vegetable and Animal Manur

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...it may then be most thoroughly mixed by passing a plough through it, or digging it down with the spade. "In what manner and in what quantity should the green sand be applied 7 All varieties of the marl are more or less compact, when freshly extracted from the pit, and if applied in such a state, would be unequally distributed over the soil; and hence the first precaution is to suffer it to be exposed lo the air for a few days, according to its compactness or tenacity, in order that it may crumble to powder, if possible: for the finer the pulverization, as shown of lime, the greater will be the immediate benefit. There is another advantage attending this delay, that we may then observe the efflorescence, and obviate its ill effects by lime. Indeed, in a majority of cases, the addition of lime in small quantity will prove serviceable, since it is generally wanting in the pure green varieties, and yet it is an important requisite in the fixed tonstituents of vegetables. The most economical method of applying the marl as above proposed, will be to cart it from the pits immediately into the fields to which it is to be applied, to throw it into heaps at convenient distances for spreading, and then to put a small quantity of lime on each heap, which should remain exposed to the air for a longer time. In regard to the quantity to be applied, a variety of opinions exist; and hence from 50 to 1000 bushels per acre have been tried, with and without success. A little attention to the theory of its operation will enable us to mproximat to the true proportion. Its strong i._ises appear to act on the organic matter in the soil, and to combine with it; hence it would be useless to apply a large quantity to a poor and light soil, for which 60 to 100...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 1148 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 57mm | 2,000g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236655648
  • 9781236655646