The American Farm Book, Or, Compend of American Agriculture; Being a Practical Treatise on Soils, Manures, Draining Irrigation, Grasses, Grain, Roots, Fruits, Cotton, Tobacco, Sugar Cane, Rice, and Every Staple Product of the United

The American Farm Book, Or, Compend of American Agriculture; Being a Practical Treatise on Soils, Manures, Draining Irrigation, Grasses, Grain, Roots, Fruits, Cotton, Tobacco, Sugar Cane, Rice, and Every Staple Product of the United

By (author) 

List price: US$22.26

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ...must be left after the second hoeing. The time of planting must depend on the climate and season. The 1st of May is about the time in latitude 40, and 10th to 15th in 42; but let it be as early as possible, yet late enough to escape spring frost. Mellow the ground well with a harrow before putting in the seed. Thick planting gives the finest, toughest brush. After Culture.--As soon as the plants are visible, run a cultivator between the rows, and follow with a hand hoe. Many neglect this till the weeds get a start, which is highly prejudicial to the crop. The cultivator or light plow should be used afterwards, followed with a hoe, and this may be repeated four or five times with advantage. Break the tops before fully ripe, or when the seed is a little past the milk; or if frost appears, then immediately after it. This is done by bending down the tops of two rows towards each other, for the convenience of cutting afterwards. They should be broken some 14 inches below the brush, and allowed to hang till fully ripe, when they may be cut and carried under cover, and spread till entirely dry. The stalks remaining on the ground, may be cut close, or pulled up and buried in the furrows for manure, or burned, and thus be restored to the earth to enrich it; or they may be carried to the yard to mix in a compost, with the droppings of the cattle. Cleaning the Brush.--Unless some larger machine is used, this is most rapidly accomplished by passing it through a kind of hetchel, made by setting upright knives near together, or it may be cleaned by a long-toothed currycomb. By the use of the hetchel, none of the little branches are broken, and the brush makes a finer, better broom. We have seen horse power machines used for cleaning the seed with great...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 134 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 254g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236649001
  • 9781236649003