American Enterprise in Foreign Markets

American Enterprise in Foreign Markets : Singer and International Harvester in Imperial Russia

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In 1914 the two largest firms in Russia were subsidiaries of American companies. Remarkably, they were almost as large as their parent companies, striking testimony to the potential of the underdeveloped Russian market. Fred Carstensen provides detailed histories of the movement of International Harvester and Singer into this new, profitable, and somewhat forbidding territory.

Describing how both sales organizations evolved in Russia, Carstensen relates their development to overall company histories, worldwide growth, changing sales strategies and structures, recruitment and training of employees, and corporate leadership in America and abroad. He finds that both firms entered the Russian market because they needed new outlets to sustain high levels of production and sales. Although there are parallels in their experiences, Carstensen identifies how the responses of the two corporations differed, reflecting the varying strategies and perceptions of company management.

Together the case studies provide a test for many of the supposed qualities and patterns of Russian economic history. Contrary to accounts of the experiences of other companies, these firms found the Russian market remarkably rich, developing a level of sales that might have suprassed the American market if war had not erupted. In contrast to the standard view of foreign enterprise, neither company came to Russia because of government invitation or influence but rather because of the intrinsic attractiveness of the markets, and neither firm found the government bureaucracy graft-ridden or the customers dishonest.

Carstensen shows that International Harvester and Singer Sewing Machine clearly influenced Russia in a positive way. Both trained large numbers of Russians in modern industrial and marketing procedures and both provided an extraordinary volume of credit on comparatively easy terms to encourage purchase of their products. Indeed, the success of their approach suggests that Russian economic development may have been limited not by weak aggregate demand but by the relative absence of sources of credit.

A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 295 pages
  • 156 x 235 x 22.86mm | 430.91g
  • Chapel Hill, United States
  • English
  • New edition
  • New edition
  • 0807857289
  • 9780807857281

About Fred V. Carstensen

Fred V. Carstensen is the co-editor of Entrepreneurship in Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union.
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