American Electrical Cases; Being a Collection of All the Important Cases (Except Patent Cases) Decided in the State and Federal Courts of the United States ... on Subjects Relating to the Telegraph, the Telephone, Electric Light Volume 2

American Electrical Cases; Being a Collection of All the Important Cases (Except Patent Cases) Decided in the State and Federal Courts of the United States ... on Subjects Relating to the Telegraph, the Telephone, Electric Light Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...in the transmission of sound substitutes the velocity of light for the velocity of sound. If the sound made by the voice reached the receiving instrument of the telephone, it would reach it long after the telephone had spoken, and it seems difficult to say that two sounds separately heard one after the other are each identical with the sound uttered, especially when the one which arrives first makes a different impression on the ear both from the words as spoken and from the words as first heard. Mr. Cromwell Fleetwood Varley mentions that he and his brother arranged two parabolic sounding-boards in such a manner that they were accurately directed toward each other and that words spoken by one brother into the focus of the parabola were heard by the other brother at the focus of the other parabola at a distance of over two miles. It would take about eight seconds for the sound to traverse this distance. If, therefore, the words had been spoken into a transmitting instrument at one focus in telephonic connection with a receiving instrument in the other focus, the one sound would have been heard eight seconds before the other. Can it be said that the two sounds were one and the same sound, or that the one sound traveled simultaneously over the two intervals of space at two different rates of speed? We do not think it necessary to express any opinion on a controversy which is more scientific than legal, and perhaps more properly metaphysical or relative to the meaning of words than scientific, as it seems to turn upon the nature of identity in relation to sound. It is enough to say that, whatever may be the merits of the controversy, it does not appear to us that the fact, if it is a fact, that sound itself is transmitted by the telephone, ..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 320 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 572g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236954475
  • 9781236954473