American Churches; A Series of Authoritative Articles on Designing, Planning, Heating, Ventilating, Lighting and General Equipment of Churches as Demonstrated by the Best Practice in the United States Volume 2

American Churches; A Series of Authoritative Articles on Designing, Planning, Heating, Ventilating, Lighting and General Equipment of Churches as Demonstrated by the Best Practice in the United States Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ...is difficult to lay down any fixed rules for the size of altars. Generally they are too short and too high. G. G. Scott's rule that the length should be onethird the width of the chancel is fairly good; though, unless the sanctuary be very wide, it will usually look better if a little longer than this. The long altars of the late Gothic period certainly had a dignity that the earlier examples did not possess. The Arundel altar was 12' 6"--that in the chapel of the Palace of the Popes at that all "altars" should be destroyed and that movable wooden tables should take their place. After the Reformation and during the Puritan period these tables occupied the old altar position; but during the celebration they were turned north and south. Many examples of the extension table or "telescope" altar remain, as that at Powich, Worcester, which measured nine feet three inches and which could be drawn out to a length of sixteen feet. "When used it was brought out into the church and fixed on trestles and the communicants would sit around it." Beautifully carved as many of these were, with their great melon Avignon 14' 6," while that at Seville Cathedral was 17'. The altar of the new St. Thomas's will be 12' 6." They should be at least 2' 6" deep and always more than this if possible. Of those illustrated, the altar at St. Andrew's Chapel, Chicago, is 5' 9" long, 2' 11" high, 3' 2" deep; Military Chapel at West Point, 9' 6" long, 3' 4" high, 2' 9" deep; St. Paul's Church, Duluth, 10' 0" long, 3' 3" high, 3' 0" deep; Chapel of the Intercession, 12' 0" long, 3' 4" high, 3' 6" deep. The altar slab or "mensa" alone is consecrated and on...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236874536
  • 9781236874535