American Breech-Loading Small Arms; A Description of Late Inventions, Including the Gatling Gun, and a Chapter on Cartridges

American Breech-Loading Small Arms; A Description of Late Inventions, Including the Gatling Gun, and a Chapter on Cartridges

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ...of the United States Armory. A few guns made in accordance with this model were issued to the troops in 1866, but they were not found to answer the requirements of the military service. Extensive changes were made in it from time to time, constituting the models of 1866, 1868 and 1870. These changes were the results of suggestions made by officers and workmen of the Springfield Armory. The arm, as thus improved, has been issued to troops in the field in competition with other systems, and reports will soon be made as to its value. The following description has been prepared by the Ordnance Bureau for the use of troops: I. The rifle musket adopted for the United States Army in 1868, is the muzzle-loading rifle musket, model 1863, altered to a breechloader. The following are the principal changes, viz.: 1st. The substitution of a new barrel, 36 in. long (32.75 in. in the bore), and one-half inch (0.5) calibre. The rifling is the same as in the altered gun of 1866, viz.: three grooves equal in width to the lands, 0.0075 in. deep, and 42 inches twist. 2d. To the barrel is screwed a receiver, or breech-frame, in which the breech-block swings upwards and forwards as in the model of 1866. 3d. The ramrod is reduced in size and is secured in its bed by a shoulder, about 4 inches below the head, which rests against a stop inserted in the stock just below the tip. 4th. The middle band is omitted, and the swivel is attached to the upper band. The bands are held in place by springs. 5th. The short-range leaf sight is replaced by a long-range sliding-sight, secured to the barrel by a dove-tail mortice and screw. 6th. The cupping of the hammer is removed and the main spring swivel is shortened. NOMENCLATURE OF ALTERED PARTS. II. Fig. 1 represents a vertical...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 96 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 186g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236603087
  • 9781236603081