The American Athlete; A Treatise on the Rules and Principles of Training for Athletic Contests, and the Regimen of Physical Culture. Also Some Short Sketches of Famous Athletes, Their Experiences, and the Notable Contests in Which They

The American Athlete; A Treatise on the Rules and Principles of Training for Athletic Contests, and the Regimen of Physical Culture. Also Some Short Sketches of Famous Athletes, Their Experiences, and the Notable Contests in Which They

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1881 edition. Excerpt: ...gave up walking at 9 p. M. on the sixth day, and had he desired to continue, he could have covered 530 miles in the six days. During the contest O'Leary made the best time on record for all distances from 150 to 226 miles. He walked 226 miles in fifty-two hours, fifty-nine minutes and thirty-eight seconds. In this match O'Leary also made the best time on record for all the miles walked from 288 to 519 3-4, both inclusive. His time for the 519 3-4 miles was 141 hours, six minutes and ten seconds, which is the best on record. Weston also beat all previous records for six days' walking, by covering 510 miles in 142 hours, fifty-four minutes and thirty-eight seconds. Sir John Astley lost over 20,000 by Weston's defeat; but he did not blame Weston, but made him a present of a large purse of money for covering the number of miles he agreed to do in the stipulated time. O'Leary's unprecedented performance created a great sensation in England, and for once the English sporting press acknowledged that the United States were ahead at long-distance predestrianism. Soon after this performance O'Leary challenged all England to compete in a six days' walk for $10,000, but none of the doughty English champions accepted. With a bank-account of $50,000, and presents of diamonds, silver plate, etc., O'Leary returned to this country. On May 17, 18, and 19, 1877, William Vaughan, the hero of the 120 miles in twenty-four hours, attempted to walk 175 miles in thirty-two hours at Manchester, England, and again upset the fastest time on record. He walked 125 miles in twenty-four hours, thirty-six minutes and thirty seconds, and from every mile from 120 to 173 he made the best time on record. He walked 173 miles in thirty-eight hours, twentyeight minutes...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236961722
  • 9781236961723