American Annals of Education and Instruction, and Journal of Literary Institutions Volume 1

American Annals of Education and Instruction, and Journal of Literary Institutions Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1831 edition. Excerpt: ...to read for yourself; for often you cannot have anyone to read for you, and it would be a great trouble to have to look up somebody, every time a word is to be read. Indeed, it is so difficult, that no one can know much, who cannot read. You come to school, to learn to read, --so that you can understand what is in good books, and what your distant friends say to you in writing. Repeat after me--In school we learn to speak--In school we learn to read--In school we learn to write. We have already begun to write; to, morrow we will begin to learn reading.' 4. In this manner, the obligations and duties of scholars are developed. The teacher can here, if he pleases, establish his course of school regulations, which he will afterwards introduce in form, as school laws. ' Children! you have come to school to learn things, which will be necessary to you through your whole lives. I am your teacher--I desire your good--and I wish to have you learn much that is good. What do you believe that I desire of you? I love you; what ought I to expect from you? Repeat distincdy after me--Children should love their teacher. Why should they love him? Because he loves them--because he desires their good. You do not always know of yourselves, what is for your good, . and what is useful; I must teach it to you. I cannot do this, unless you are obedient. What must I therefore desire of you? Repeat after me--Children must obey their teacher. You come here to learn, not to play. 1 will try to make your learning as pleasant as possible. But you must try, too, if you expect to learn anything. If you are not constandy diligent, and do not attend to the subjects that I propose to you, you can learn but very litde. What do I expect of you? I will tell you, and you may repeat it...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 260 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 472g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236664795
  • 9781236664792