The American Agriculturist History of the United States; A Complete and Concise Account of the Growth and Development of the Country from Its Discovery to the Present Time, with Chapters Upon the Customs and Manners of the Various Periods

The American Agriculturist History of the United States; A Complete and Concise Account of the Growth and Development of the Country from Its Discovery to the Present Time, with Chapters Upon the Customs and Manners of the Various Periods

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ...was moving southward with Rochambeau and the allied forces of French and Americans. In the meantime, on the 30th of August, De Grasse, with the French fleet of twenty-eight ships of the line bearing 4,000 soldiers, arrived from the West Indies and blockaded the York River. The English admiral, Graves, sailed from New York to break up the blockade, but his fleet was so roughly handled by De Grasse on the 5th of September that he was obliged to return whence he had come. De Barras had arrived from Newport by this time with eight more French ships of the line and ten transports carrying heavy guns for the siege. On September 28th the siege of Yorktown was commenced in earnest by the allied forces, who outnumbered the British, under Washington and Rochambeau. Cornwallis withdrew his advanced posts, and Tarleton was hemmed in at Gloucester. The latter attempted a sally but was driven back. On the night of the 5th of October trenches were opened 600 yards from the works of Cornwallis. The Americans on the right and the French on the left worked with zeal. In three days the first parallel was. completed, and a heavy cannonade was kept up on the fortifications of the enemy. On the night of the nth the second parallel was commenced. Two advanced redoubts were carried on the night of the 14th by storm. Early in the morning of the 16th the British made a sally, but were driven back with out having accomplished anything of value to their side. Cornwallis now felt the hopelessness of further resistance. He was opposed by a superior force and able generals. His escape was cut off on all sides, by land and by water. On the 17th he proposed to surrender. The next day the terms of capitulation were drawn up, and at 4 o'clock in the afternoon of October 19, 1781, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236507916
  • 9781236507914