American Adventure by Land and Sea; Being Remarkable Instances of Enterprise and Fortitude Among Americans. Shipwrecks, Adventures at Home and Abroad, Indian Captivities, Etc Volume 1

American Adventure by Land and Sea; Being Remarkable Instances of Enterprise and Fortitude Among Americans. Shipwrecks, Adventures at Home and Abroad, Indian Captivities, Etc Volume 1

By (author) 

List price: US$20.00

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...left Major Harlan defended the front until three only of his men remained. He also fell, covered with wounds. The Indians now rushed upon them with their tomahawks, spreading confusion and dismay through their broken and disabled ranks. The whole right, left, and centre, gave way, and a mingled and precipitate retreat commenced. Colonel Todd was shot through the body, and when last seen he was reeling in his saddle, while the blood gushed from his wound. Many brave men perished on that day. Of the one hundred and eighty-two, who went into the battle, one third were killed and seven were made prisoners. Boone, after witnessing the death of his son, and many dear friends, found himself almost entirely surrounded at the very commencement of the retreat. Being intimately acquainted with the ground, he, with a few friends, dashed into the ravine, which the Indians had quitted. After baffling many pursuers, he crossed the river below the ford, by swimming, and, entering the wood at a point where there was no pursuit, returned by a circuitous route to Bryant's station. The news of this disaster thrtw all Kentucky into mourning. The reader remembers young Reynolds, who replied with such rough and ready humor to the pompous summons of Girty at the siege of Bryant's. This young man, after bearing his share in the action with distinguished gallantry, was galloping with several other horsemen in order to reach the ford. The great body of fugitives had preceded them, and their situation was critical and dangerous. About halfway between the battle-ground and the river, the party overtook Captain Patterson, on foot, exhausted by the rapidity of the flight, and, in consequence of his wounds, so disabled, that he could not keep up with the main body of the men on...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123660718X
  • 9781236607188