America, the Land We Love; A Narrative Record of the Achievements of the American People, Their History--Government--Wars--Inventions--Discoveries--Great Men--Famous Women--Industry--Commerce--And the Essential Elements That Have Entered

America, the Land We Love; A Narrative Record of the Achievements of the American People, Their History--Government--Wars--Inventions--Discoveries--Great Men--Famous Women--Industry--Commerce--And the Essential Elements That Have Entered

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ...and equipping the present subway. The new one will cost in the neighborhood of $300,000,000. Boston has an excellent subway system. And Chicago has a unique underground freight system underlying her business district and covering more than fourteen miles. It is designed to transport merchandise from warehouse to store and from store to the railroad freight stations. The greatest engineering feat was that which the young Tennessee lawyer, William G. McAdoo, performed when he drove his railroad tubes underneath the Hudson River, thus connecting New York with New Jersey. For eight years he and his engineers and "ground-hogs" pitted their strength against the swollen floods over their heads. Foot by foot, occasionally stopping to plaster up the roof of their tunnel where the river had torn through, they drove by hydraulic pressure a huge steel shield through rock and silt, linking together the great steel rings of the tubes as each two foot section was cleared away. It was a mighty battle, but in the year 1910 the tunnel was complete and the first public train rumbled from the heart of New York to the shore and thence down under the great river and up again to the New Jersey shore. Like New York, Boston's suburban influx every day overtaxed her ferry service. Consequently, Boston has a tunnel a mile and a half long reaching from the city proper to East Boston and running beneath a part of Boston Harbor. But one of the most unique tunnel constructions connects the city of Detroit with the Canadian city of Windsor. An American railroad expert, William J. Wilgus, studied the peculiar problems presented by the Detroit River, where nearly as much traffic passes as in the Suez Canal. He conceived the idea of dredging a furrow in the river bed, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 146 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 272g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236553152
  • 9781236553157