America and Its Critics
11%
off

America and Its Critics : Virtues and Vices of the Democratic Hyperpower

By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 3 business days
When will my order arrive?

Not expected to be delivered to the United States by Christmas Not expected to be delivered to the United States by Christmas

Description

No other country in the world evokes such contrasting sentiments as the United States of America. This is not new, but it has become particularly virulent in recent years. The reason is simple: after the end of the cold war America has remained the only super power in the world. Or rather, it has become a veritable hyper-power without apparent limits to the exercise of its power. The fate of the world lies in large part in its hands. This book analyses the most widespread criticisms of American democracy - namely , that it is plebiscitary, devoid of voters, unduly favours the rich, and imperial. It shows that these criticisms fail to hit the mark. Yet even if its vices are fewer and different from what its critics often claim, American democracy cannot be read as an exemplary catalogue of virtues, as its apologists would have it. Resting on contradictions rather than coherence, American democracy cannot be seen as a model and even less as an ideology. Rather it should be understood as a method. Clearing away the misunderstandings and prejudices that cloud contemporary debates about America, this book brings out with exceptional clarity the strengths as well as the weaknesses of the American democratic experience. In a century when no country can hope to escape from the influence of American power, it is vital to understand both.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 220 pages
  • 152 x 230 x 22mm | 458.13g
  • Polity Press
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 1. Auflage
  • 0745642500
  • 9780745642505

Review quote

"If you want to understand American politics, its origins, development, and contemporary character, this is the book to read. Fabbrini possesses a masterful command of the complexities of the American political order, yet manages to convey them clearly and memorably. Throughout this compact book, he compares and contrasts American politics with West European politics, delivering broader insight into variations among democracies, while distinguishing his own perspectives from those of both America's harshest critics and its most ardent apologists. An enormously engaging and satisfying read." George Breslauer, University of California, Berkeley "This is a work of the highest intellectual level. It reflects a mastery of the fields of American politics and of West European comparative politics. The author has the distinctive ability to be a past master of both subjects while retaining a vital critical distance from each. The book is exhaustively researched and clearly presented. After reading it, no American or European will look at the American political system in quite the same way again." Allen Lynch, University of Virginiashow more

About Sergio Fabbrini

Sergio Fabbrini is Professor of Political Science at the University of Trento.show more

Back cover copy

No other country in the world evokes such contrasting sentiments as the United States of America. This is not new, but it has become particularly virulent in recent years. The reason is simple: after the end of the cold war America has remained the only super power in the world. Or rather, it has become a veritable hyper-power without apparent limits to the exercise of its power. The fate of the world lies in large part in its hands. This book analyses the most widespread criticisms of American democracy - namely, that it is plebiscitary, devoid of voters, unduly favours the rich, and imperial. It shows that these criticisms fail to hit the mark. Yet even if its vices are fewer and different from what its critics often claim, American democracy cannot be read as an exemplary catalogue of virtues, as its apologists would have it. Resting on contradictions rather than coherence, American democracy cannot be seen as a model and even less as an ideology. Rather it should be understood as a method. Clearing away the misunderstandings and prejudices that cloud contemporary debates about America, this book brings out with exceptional clarity the strengths as well as the weaknesses of the American democratic experience. In a century when no country can hope to escape from the influence of American power, it is vital to understand both.show more

Table of contents

PREFACE. CHAPTER. 1 - ANTI-AMERICANISM IN EUROPE. 1.1. Introduction. 1.2 Anti-Americanism in European Context. 1.3. America and the European Left. 1.4. America and the European Right. 1.5. America and the European Catholic Center. 1.6. Misunderstanding America. 1.7. Conclusion. CHAPTER 2 - A PLEBISCITARY DEMOCRACY?. 2.1. Introduction. 2.2. The Origins of Separated Government. 2.3. Congressional Government. 2.4. The Crisis of Congressional Government. 2.5. Presidential Government. 2.6. The Difficulties of Presidential Government. 2.7. Conclusion. CHAPTER 3 - A DEMOCRACY WITHOUT THE PEOPLE?. 3.1. Introduction. 3.2. The Characteristics of the Electoral System. 3.3 The Developments of the Electoral Process. 3.4. Why Americans don't vote: the debate. 3.5. Political Parties from Decline to Transformation?. 3.6. Conclusion. CHAPTER 4 - A DEMOCRACY FOR THE RICH?. 4.1. Introduction. 4.2. The American Commercial Republic. 4.3. The Neo-conservative Revolution. 4.4. The Weakness of the Democrats: The Two Clinton Presidencies. 4.5. The Anti-politics of the Elites: Term Limits and Recall. 4.6. The Social Implications of American Liberalism. 4.7 Conclusion. CHAPTER 5 - AN IMPERIAL DEMOCRACY?. 5.1. Introduction. 5.2. Foreign and Domestic Policy in America. 5.3. Hegemonic America and the Cold War. 5.4. The End of the Cold War and the First Gulf War. 5.5. The 1990s and the Schizophrenic Power. 5.6. George W. Bush's America and the Second Gulf War. 5.7. Conclusion. CHAPTER 6. CONCLUSIONS - AMERICA AS A METHOD. 6.1 Introduction. 6.2. American Exceptionalism. 6.3 The Societal and Institutional Antinomies. 6.4. Political Change and American Antinomies. 6.5. America: a Model or a Method?. 6.6. Conclusionshow more

Review Text

"If you want to understand American politics, its origins, development, and contemporary character, this is the book to read. Fabbrini possesses a masterful command of the complexities of the American political order, yet manages to convey them clearly and memorably. Throughout this compact book, he compares and contrasts American politics with West European politics, delivering broader insight into variations among democracies, while distinguishing his own perspectives from those of both America's harshest critics and its most ardent apologists. An enormously engaging and satisfying read." George Breslauer, University of California, Berkeley "This is a work of the highest intellectual level. It reflects a mastery of the fields of American politics and of West European comparative politics. The author has the distinctive ability to be a past master of both subjects while retaining a vital critical distance from each. The book is exhaustively researched and clearly presented. After reading it, no American or European will look at the American political system in quite the same way again." Allen Lynch, University of Virginiashow more