Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys in the Form of Ingots, Castings, Bars, Plates, Sheets, Tubes, Wire and All Forms of Structural Shapes

Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys in the Form of Ingots, Castings, Bars, Plates, Sheets, Tubes, Wire and All Forms of Structural Shapes

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ... the amount of aluminum used, however, being small. The amount of aluminum used to give the best results varies with the grade of steel, amount of occluded gases, temperature of the molten metal, etc. Aluminum is usually added in proportions of from oneeighth to three-quarters of a pound to the ton of steel; the aluminum being added either in the ladle, or in the case of steel castings, with more economy of the aluminum as the metal is being poured into the ingot moulds or groups of moulds. Until the proper percentage of aluminum to add to any particular grade of steel has been determined, it is advisable to start with small lots, for instance, with two or three ounces to the ton, working up to the proportion that seems to give the best results. The special advantages to be gained by the use of aluminum in steel manufacture are enumerated as follows: 1. The increase of soundness of tops of ingots and consequent decrease of scrap and other loss, which more than compensates for the cost of the small amount of aluminum added. 2. The quieting the ebullition in molten steel, thereby allowing the successful pouring of wild " heats from furnaces, ladles, etc. 3. The aid to the homogeneity of the steel; (a)--By preventing oxidation; (b)--By that property of aluminum by which it rapidly permeates the body of the steel, thereby increasing the ease with which other metals will alloy homogeneously with steel; (c)--By decreasing the time that steel will remain fluid after being poured into moulds, and causing the steel when solidifying to do so more evenly, preventing a central core remaining molten longer than the outside portion of the metal, and in this way stopping the segregation of phosphorus and other impurities in the mother..."show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236593383
  • 9781236593382