Alliteration in Spencer's Poetry Discussed and Compared with the Alliteration as Employed by Drayton and Daniel Volume 1-2

Alliteration in Spencer's Poetry Discussed and Compared with the Alliteration as Employed by Drayton and Daniel Volume 1-2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...The Owl, where birds take the place of persons, their names alliterate in much the same way as the personages of his other poems; the names alliterate with a modifying adjective as: bald Buzzard, 860: black-ey'd Bat, 502; cruell Kite, 201; jolly Jay, 603; Peacock, proud, 947; witless Wood-cock, 942. For other constructions a few examples will sufiice, as there is nothing in the manner of alliterating different from what has already been remarked. ' The Kite, the Crow, and all the birds of prey, 313. The Lark, the Linnet, and the gentler sort, 217. When the sweet Merle, and warbling Mavis bee, 114. This form of alliteration is carried even further by Drayton in his poem, Noah's Flood, for there not only the names of the birds, but also of the animals which are gathered into the ark are often joined through alliteration. In The Owl the birds are the characters of the poem, and hence their names stand quite prominent. In Noah's Flood, however the relation is different, and this form of alliteration does not extend through the whole poem, but is confined almost entirely to the passages which describe the assembling of the fowls and animals into the ark, and their rejoicing, when the dove's return announces that the flood is past. Examples for the name with modifying adjective, are: brisly boar, 275; crook-backd camel, 295; crowned cock, 387; carrion crow, 404; iron-eating ostrich, 385; skipping squirrel 323; swift-wingd swallow, 391; prating parrot, 421. Examples for other constructions: The hart with his dear hind, the buck the doe, 281 The clambring goat, and coney, us'd to keep, 284 The merl and mavis on the highest spray, 417. The hull doth bellow, and the horse doth nigh, The stag, the buck, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236764579
  • 9781236764577