Allen's Commercial Organic Analysis; A Treatise on the Properties, Modes of Assaying, and Proximate Analytical Examination of the Various Organic Chemicals and Products Employed in the Arts, Manufactures, Medicine, Etc., with Volume 1

Allen's Commercial Organic Analysis; A Treatise on the Properties, Modes of Assaying, and Proximate Analytical Examination of the Various Organic Chemicals and Products Employed in the Arts, Manufactures, Medicine, Etc., with Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ...of as lactose. Maltose is applied to the disaccharide derived from starch. The abbreviation A. O. A. C. indicates the official and provisional methods of analysis adopted by the Association of Official Agricultural Chemists and published by the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Chemistry as Bulletin 107, September, 1907, superseding Bulletins 46 and 65. The Monosaccharides.--To this group belong the naturally occurring sugars containing 5 and 6 carbon atoms, known as pentoses and hexoses and also the closely related synthetical sugars with 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 carbon atoms. They are characterised by the following general properties: 1. They are easily oxidised and reduce Fehling's solution. 2. They form with phenylhydrazine and acetic acid sparingly soluble crystalline osazones. 3. Those hexoses which occur naturally undergo alcoholic fermentation with yeast. 4. They form additive compounds with hydrogen cyanide. The Disaccharides.--This group consists of sugars of the formula 11, e.g.t cane sugar, milk sugar, maltose, melibiose and others formed by the union of two monosaccharide residues through an oxygen atom. It may also be extended to include sugars, such as raffinose, formed by the union of three or more monosaccharide residues. The general properties of the members of this group are: 1. They are converted on hydrolysis by mineral acids or by specific enzymes into monosaccharides. 2. They are not directly fermentable unless first hydrolysed. The Polysaccharides.--This group includes substances of high molecular weight, of the general formula nCeH1., O5 such as cellulose, starch, glycogen and dextrin. They are amorphous substances and yield simpler saccharides or ultimately monosaccharides on hydrolysis. The following...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 198 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 363g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236810708
  • 9781236810700