Algiers; Their Government, Laws, Religion, and Natural Productions; And Containing a Sketch of Their Various Revolutions, a Description of the Domestic Manners and Customs of the Moors, Arabs, and Turks; An Account of the Four Great

Algiers; Their Government, Laws, Religion, and Natural Productions; And Containing a Sketch of Their Various Revolutions, a Description of the Domestic Manners and Customs of the Moors, Arabs, and Turks; An Account of the Four Great

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1817 edition. Excerpt: ...actually beset us. And besides, the discoveries-we are thus eager to pursue, and which are the occasion of all this anxiety and labour, how seldom is it that they answer our expectations? Instead of really diverting or instructing us in the manner we apprehended, they have sometimes produced quite con.trary effects, by engaging us-at once in a very 'serious turn of thought and meditation. ' For here in these diffusive scenes of antiquity, in the more celebrated cities of Africa, we are immediately struck with the very solitude of the few domes, arches, and porticos that are left__standing, which history informs us, were once crowded with inhabitants; where Syphax and-Massinissa, Scipio and Caesar, the orthodox Christians and the Aria-ns, the Saracens and the Turks, have given-laws in their turn. Every heap of ruins points_out-to us the weakness and instability of all human art and cnutrivance, reminding us farther of the many thousands that lie buried below them, who are now lost in oblivion, and forgotten to the world. Whilst we are full of these thoughts and meditations, Christianity steps in to our relief, acquainting us that we are only strangers and pilgrim upon earth; see/ting' a city, not like these, subject to the strokes of time and fortune, but which hath everfoundations, whose builder and uiaher is God. IN the beginning of the twelfth century, Techifien, thechief of a Moorish tribe, had 'the 'address to unite under his command all the other tribes; with these he engaged the Arabs, who had the greatest sway in Africa, over whom he gained several important victories, and at length, expelled them out of all the western parts; and thus formed a powerful empire in the neighbourhood of Mount Atlas. He was...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236970829
  • 9781236970824