Alaska Fisheries; Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Fisheries, United States Senate, Sixty-Second Congress, Second [-Third] Session, on S. 5856, a Bill to Amend an ACT for the Protection and Regulation Volume 1-2; V. 53

Alaska Fisheries; Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Fisheries, United States Senate, Sixty-Second Congress, Second [-Third] Session, on S. 5856, a Bill to Amend an ACT for the Protection and Regulation Volume 1-2; V. 53

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ... assuming the output in all the other rivers will remain approximately constant, and we then know what number in Wood River is necessary to keep the catch up to a certain point. We have then determined the ratio of number of spawning fish to the number that may be safely caught. The Chairman. Doctor, I think it would be interesting here to have a statement of what it has cost to carry on that counting there and what the companies have contributed. Dr. Evermann. I shall be glad to furnish those figures. I think we cangive them; but we have not them on hand here. Mr. Wickersham. Doctor, in 1908 there were 2,600,000 fish which went up Wood River. The next year 800,000 went up the river, and the next year Dr. Evermann. Six hundred and seventy thousand. Mr. Wickersham. Last year, you do not know how many? Dr. Evermann. Something like 350,000. Mr. Wickersham. May not the diminution in the number of fish going up Word River result from overfishing? Dr. Evermann. Some light can be thrown upon that question by taking the totals for the three years. The total of the escape and the catch in 1908 was 9,000,000. In 1909 it was 7,930,000; in 1910 it was 7,000,000: 1911, we have not the figures, but it is a decrease. The Chairman. But the fishing that would have the effect of diminishing the number of fish available these later years would have occurred just before the period you began to count, so that you can not tell as to the extent of the injury done by the fishing for the pnt few years? Mr. Madison. Let me explain, Senator. The way it would appear to me is this: In 1910, if this four-year theory holds, the pack or four rears back would be 1906. That year the Wood River was chocka-block full of traps, and if the four-year theory holds good that would...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 310 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 558g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236661451
  • 9781236661456