Air Pollution Control Engineering
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Air Pollution Control Engineering

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Description

A panel of respected air pollution control educators and practicing professionals critically survey the both principles and practices underlying control processes, and illustrate these with a host of detailed design examples for practicing engineers. The authors discuss the performance, potential, and limitations of the major control processes-including fabric filtration, cyclones, electrostatic precipitation, wet and dry scrubbing, and condensation-as a basis for intelligent planning of abatement systems,. Additional chapters critically examine flare processes, thermal oxidation, catalytic oxidation, gas-phase activated carbon adsorption, and gas-phase biofiltration. The contributors detail the Best Available Technologies (BAT) for air pollution control and provide cost data, examples, theoretical explanations, and engineering methods for the design, installation, and operation of air pollution process equipment. Methods of practical design calculation are illustrated by numerous numerical calculations.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 504 pages
  • 178.05 x 254 x 30.23mm | 975.22g
  • Humana Press Inc.
  • Totowa, NJ, United States
  • English
  • Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 2004
  • 12 Illustrations, black and white; XVII, 504 p. 12 illus.
  • 1617373974
  • 9781617373978
  • 2,508,877

Back cover copy

Many human activities-and industrial production in particular-produce enormous quantities of wastes and pollution that require the development of major abatement technologies, processes whose implementation and costs must be justified by the degree of abatement achieved. In Air Pollution Control Engineering: Handbook of Environmental Engineering, Volume 1, a panel of eminent air pollution control educators and practicing professionals critically survey both the principles and practices involved in air pollution control processes. The authors discuss the performance, potential, and limitations of the major control processes-including fabric filtration, cyclones, electrostatic precipitation, wet and dry scrubbing, and condensation-as a basis for intelligent planning and realization of abatement systems. Additional chapters critically examine flare processes, thermal oxidation, catalytic oxidation, gas-phase activated carbon adsorption, and gas-phase biofiltration. The contributors also detail the Best Available Technologies (BAT) for air pollution control and provide cost data, examples, theoretical explanations, and engineering methods for the design, installation, and operation of air pollution process equipment. The emphasis throughout is on developing the necessary engineering from fundamental principles of chemistry, physics, and mathematics. A companion volume, Advanced Air and Noise Pollution Control, Handbook of Environmental Engineering, Volume 2, covers the use of multiple techniques to deal with air, thermal, and noise pollution. Cutting-edge and highly practical, Air Pollution Control Engineering: Handbook of Environmental Engineering, Volume 1 offers educators, students, and practicing engineers a strong grounding in the principles of this critical field, as well as effective methods for developing optimal abatement technologies at costs that are fully justified by the degree of abatement achieved.show more

Review quote

"...the text will be equally useful for environmental engineering University students or those working in the industry." - Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology "...one of the best texts I have reviewed...excellent and strongly recommend(ed)." Journal of Hazardous Materialsshow more

Table of contents

Air Quality and Pollution Control Lawrence K. Wang, Jerry R. Taricska, Yung-Tse Hung, and Kathleen Hung Li 1. Introduction 2. Characteristics of Air Pollutants 3. Standards 3.1. Ambient Air Quality Standards 3.2. Emission Standards 4. Sources 5. Effects 6. Measurements 6.1. Ambient Sampling 6.2. Source Sampling 6.3. Sample Locations 6.4. Gas Flow Rates 6.5. Relative Humidity 6.6. Sample Train 6.7. Determination of Size Distribution 7. Gas Stream Calculations 7.1. General 7.2. Emission Stream Flow Rate and Temperature Calculations 7.3. Moisture Content, Dew Point Content, and Sulfur Trioxide Calculations 7.4. Particulate Matter Loading 7.5. Heat Content Calculations 7.6. Dilution Air Calculations 8. Gas Stream Conditioning 8.1. General 8.2. Mechanical Collectors 8.3. Gas Coolers 8.4. Gas Preheaters 9. Air Quality Management 9.1. Recent Focus 9.2. Ozone 9.3. Air Toxics 9.4. Greenhouse Gases Reduction and Industrial Ecology Approach 9.5. Environmental Laws 10. Control 11. Conclusions 12. Examples 12.1. Example 1 12.2. Example 2 Nomenclature References Fabric Filtration Lawrence K. Wang, Clint Williford, and Wei-Yin Chen 1. Introduction 2. Principle and Theory 3. Application 3.1. General 3.2. Gas Cleaning 3.3. Efficiency 4. Engineering Design 4.1. Pretreatment of an Emission Stream 4.2. Air-to-Cloth Ratio 4.3. Fabric Cleaning Design 4.4. Baghouse Configuration 4.5. Construction Materials 4.6. Design Range of Effectiveness 5. Operation 5.1. General Considerations 5.2. Collection Efficiency 5.3. System Pressure Drop 5.4. Power Requirements 5.5. Filter Bag Replacement 6. Management 6.1. Evaluation of Permit Application 6.2. Economics 6.3. New Technology Awareness 7. Design Examples and Questions Nomenclature References Appendix 1: HAP Emission Stream Data Form Appendix 2: Metric Conversions Cyclones Jose Renato Coury, Reinaldo Pisani Jr., and Yung-Tse Hung 1. Introduction 2. Cyclones for Industrial Applications 2.1. General Description 2.2. Correlations for Cyclone Efficiency 2.3. Correlations for Cyclone Pressure Drop 2.4. Other Relations of Interest 2.5. Application Examples 3. Costs of Cyclone and Auxiliary Equipment 3.1. Cyclone Purchase Cost 3.2. Fan Purchase Cost 3.3. Ductwork Purchase Cost 3.4. Stack Purchase Cost 3.5. Damper Purchase Cost 3.6. Calculation of Present and Future Costs 3.7. Cost Estimation Examples 4. Cyclones for Airborne Particulate Sampling 4.1. Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere 4.2. General Correlation for Four Commercial Cyclones 4.3. A Semiempirical Approach 4.4. The 'Cyclone Family' Approach 4.5. PM2.5 Sampler 4.6. Examples Nomenclature References Electrostatic Precipitation Chung-Shin J. Yuan and Thomas T. Shen 1. Introduction 2. Principles of Operation 2.1. Corona Discharge 2.2. Electrical Field Characteristics 2.3. Particle Charging 2.4. Particle Collection 3. Design Methodology and Considerations 3.1. Precipitator Size 3.2. Particulate Resistivity 3.3. Internal Configuration 3.4. Electrode Systems 3.5. Power Requirements 3.6. Gas Flow Systems 3.7. Precipitator Housing 3.8. Flue Gas Conditioning 3.9. Removal of Collected Particles 3.10. Instrumentation 4. Applications 4.1. Electric Power Industry 4.2. Pulp and Paper Industry 4.3. Metallurgical Industry 4.4. Cement Industry 4.5. Chemical Industry 4.6. Municipal Solid-Waste Incinerators 4.7. Petroleumshow more