Air Brakes; An Up-To-Date Treatise on the Westinghouse Air Brake as Designed for Passenger and Freight Service and for Electric Cars, with Rules for Care and Operation

Air Brakes; An Up-To-Date Treatise on the Westinghouse Air Brake as Designed for Passenger and Freight Service and for Electric Cars, with Rules for Care and Operation

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 edition. Excerpt: ...The automatic slack-adjuster, when used at all, is usually fitted to the passenger car equipment. The automatic slack-adjuster, Figs. 83 and 84, is manufactured by the Westinghouse Air Brake Company. The purpose of the apparatus is to maintain a constant, predetermined piston travel. The brake-cylinder piston acts as a valve to control the admission and release of air to pipe B through port A. Whenever the stroke of the brake-cylinder piston is so great that port A is passed by the piston, air from the cylinder enters port A into pipe B and enters cylinder C, which is shown in section in Fig. 84. The air entering the small cylinder acts on piston 1, forcing it to the left, compressing spring 2, and causing the small pawl 3 to engage the ratchet wheel 4. When the brake is released, the brake-cylinder piston returns, and air in the small cylinder C escapes to the atmosphere through pipe B and port A, thus permitting spring 2 to force piston I to its normal position. In so doing, pawl 3 turns the ratchet wheel 4 on screw 5, and thereby draws the fulcrum end of lever 6 slightly nearer the slack-adjuster cylinder C. Each operation of piston 1, as just described, reduces the brake-cylinder piston travel about 31; of an inch. When piston 1 is in its normal position, the outer end of pawl 3 is lifted, permitting screw 5 to be turned by hand. Locomotive Driver Brakes. The brakes are applied to the drivers of a locomotive in two general ways--by the outside equalized system, Fig. 85, and by cams, Fig. 86. The former scheme has practically replaced the latter, because of its simple design and adjustment. In the system, Fig. 85, the levers are proportioned so that each wheel receives the same braking pressure. If the brake cylinders are each 14...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 56 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 118g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236794338
  • 9781236794338