Agriculture of New-York; Comprising an Account of the Classification, Composition and Distribution of the Solls and Rocks, and the Natural Waters of the Different Geological Formations Together with a Condensed View of the Volume 5

Agriculture of New-York; Comprising an Account of the Classification, Composition and Distribution of the Solls and Rocks, and the Natural Waters of the Different Geological Formations Together with a Condensed View of the Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 edition. Excerpt: ...detected in its consequences. The greater effect may be the fungous growth; the lesser, the exudation of sap from the puncture, so that in these cases the effect might be mistaken for the cause. The effect of remedies may aid us materially in arriving at a correct determination of the cause. There is still another affection of the leaf, which results in the injury if not the death of the plant. The elm, maple, chestnut, and several other trees are affected in the way about to be described. Their leaves dry at the apex or on the edge, become brown, and curl up. This affection may appear upon a small part of the leaf only, or it may cover the whole surface of a part or all of the leaves upon a branch: if only a few leaves are diseased, the branch will live; if all, it dies simultaneously with the leaves; and in some instances the disease affects so many limbs, that the life of the tree is imminently threatened. An elm standing before my door in Hudson-street has lost a part of its branches every year for many years in succession. Another thrifty elm was extensively affected, and most of its large branches died in the course of two weeks. The disease is the same in both cases, and, I think, in all the instances which begin by the drying of the apex or margin of the leaf, whatever may be the species of the tree. In no case could I find an insect to which the effects could be attributed, but the affection seems to prevail most under the influence of certain peculiar states of the weather; and I have also observed, that when the potato rot has been prevalent in its worst form, the trees have been most severely affected with this disease. This disease constitutes a form of blight, which, on a close examination of the leaves and limb, proves itself to be...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 98 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 191g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236608003
  • 9781236608000